Category Archives: Connections

Exciting things on the horizon!

There are a couple of big things on the horizon that we’re VERY excited about. In addition to the main presidentialcollections.org site, there are several auxiliary pieces of the project that have been coming together rather nicely. They include:

1) The catalog: presidential sites and libraries, mapped

map-thumbAs we’ve mentioned before, there are more than 70 locations dedicated to Abraham Lincoln alone.* The National Archives system only formally covers modern (post-Hoover) presidents. The resulting landscape is broad, diverse, and incredibly hard to wrap one’s head around. What if you wanted to tour all the major Lincoln sites? What if you needed to search across John Quincy Adams’ letters?

Those tasks just got much easier: we’ve built a catalog of presidential sites and libraries. You can browse by president or location, and we store basic information about each. Our hope is that more of these locations will be partners in the CPC site (and we certainly note when they’re searchable through CPC!) but the catalog is a rich resource whether these orgs have a formal relationship with Presidential Collections project or not: it’s the only place in the country collecting this data in this way, and we’re very proud of it.

*Thanks to Thomas Mackie at the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum for this statistic!

2) Digital Development Resources

whyI’ve written about the these before, primarily about the challenges of synthesizing all of your amazing feedback into usable tools. So lets call this a start… but it’s a start we feel quite good about.

The page contains 5 videos and a few writeups to help jump-start organizations who might have trouble scanning, digitizing, or communicating on the web. There’s also great material here for convincing your colleagues, your stakeholders, yourself that this is a good idea.

3) Publicity materials!

twitter_logo_blueIf you like what we’re doing here, please please please help us spread the word! We’ve created this publicity page to make it easy for you: presidentialcollections.org/publicity

Many thanks to all of you who have remained interested in this project. We’re so very excited to be seeing some pieces come together, and will be doubling down our publicity efforts in the coming weeks!

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Who’s on first? Keeping track

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[photo credit: bahri altay / shutterstock.com]

We have recently debuted a new internal tracking system for our CPC partners. We have a lot of contacts with people who work in presidential sites and libraries, and while my email is a good way for ME to keep track of conversations and partner activity, it is not so good for other people. So Amber, our web developer, built a tracking system in the back-end of our content management system. Now instead of my email and a spreadsheet that lives only on my desktop, we are tracking our interactions with partners in our CMS, and that means it is available to the whole team at any point in the process.

Recruiting partners, adding metadata into CPC, and finalizing partner information on the CPC website generally takes many steps and a long time. I generally reach out to a potential partner at least three times before we can finalize a partnership, and then it takes many more emails to handle the details such as the partner agreement and the data export of metadata for CPC.

This isn’t a problem—it is just the process that is necessary to build partnerships and grow CPC. In many cases, potential partners don’t know us and need to learn about the Miller Center and CPC before they are willing to consider joining the project.

Then we have many partners that don’t yet have digital items but in many cases they are working on it. So I email a partner and then check back in periodically to find out where they are in their process. One partner that I first reached out to in November 2015 was interested, but they needed to put their items online before they could consider a partnership with CPC. By August 2016 the site was up!

That timetable is actually fast—it normally takes a long time for an organization to put their collections online, and it takes a long time to redesign websites. One partner we work with took more than two years to redesign their website. It takes a long time in part because many partner organizations are beholden to outside web design companies to build their new websites. And honestly, building a new website is detailed and complicated work. It cannot be done on the fly.

I’m excited about our new tracking system because it is one step toward moving CPC past a temporary grant project and into life as a full-fledged program. The IMLS grant continues into 2017 but we are working on building more permanent systems and processes for CPC that can see it into the future. So although it has taken me a long time to put all the partner information into the tracking system, I know that it is effort well spent because it shares and preserves valuable information.

 

Resources for Teachers

The CPC team has been building up its collections, adding partners and digital items. As of now, CPC has about 250,000 digital items, more than 30 partners, and covers almost every U.S. president. We’ve come a long way!

Recently, we have partnered with Professor Kathryn Brownell of Purdue University to begin creating educational resources using the CPC materials. We strongly believe that CPC will be more useful to educators if resources are available for them. Professor Brownell has created Recasting American Presidential History in the Classroom. Her work is focused on undergraduates students and reconsiders how the presidency is taught.

She says it best:

“…this website will encourage students to study the American presidency from a sociocultural perspective. This website aims to begin a classroom conversation about the American presidency in ways that capitalize on a generation of insights from social, economic, cultural, and political historians.”

Offering secondary sources, primary sources, discussion questions, and research activities, Brownell looks at the U.S. presidency from a variety of different angles, reconsidering the traditional approach of teaching the presidency that focuses on a “top-down” approach to history. Right now, there are three modules completed, with the remaining seven scheduled to be done by the fall.

Tomorrow Brownell and I are heading to the National Council for History Education conference to debut her project. We are excited to offer this unique educational resource. And we are thrilled to be able to do it at the NCHE.

Welcome to the NARA Presidential Collections!

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CPC is thrilled to welcome the National Archives and the Presidential Libraries as partners in CPC. We are excited about this new collection, but really we should call it collections. Although the digital items originate from NARA, within NARA there are many different organizations that hold collections. We have items from all thirteen Presidential Libraries (Hoover through George W. Bush) but we also have items from NARA’s Electronic Records Archive and from its regional offices.

Having NARA as a partner in CPC is hugely important as its Presidential Libraries cover the modern-day presidents. This partnership will give users the chance to search across the NARA digital collections along with our other partners. It helps CPC reach its goal of bringing together a critical mass of materials to be a valuable resource to researchers and educators.

CPC Goes West

Vancouver Skyline, Tourism Vancouver
Vancouver Skyline, Tourism Vancouver

Amber and I headed west two weeks ago to beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia, for the great Digital Libraries Federation Forum. We presented about Connecting Presidential Collections, explaining the basics of the project. We also talked about the main challenge we have encountered so far in the project: the inability of potential partners to participate in CPC.

Although we have reached out in various ways to more than 200 organizations (and responses have been uniformly enthusiastic), we have less than 20 partners. We wanted to learn about the barriers that make it hard for organizations to participate in CPC. (To participate, organizations send us an export of metadata about their digital collections.) We created a survey for organizations to tell us a little bit about their challenges. The responses indicated that digital expertise is lacking in many of these smaller presidential sites, libraries, and museums. And although many said they lacked technical expertise (and perhaps confidence), many indicated that they had interest in digital collections and the technologies that support them.

The specific reasons that organizations can’t participate in CPC range widely but some more common reasons came down to needing:

  • more money (usually for people),
  • more technology (for example a content management system to host a digital collection),
  • a better understanding of how to use the technology (being able to update the website, for example).

There is also the question of priorities. Some organizations still do not prioritize making their digital collections available online.

We stressed to the DLF Forum community that our work of evangelizing the importance of digital collections is not done. Although much of the conference focused on new technologies and new approaches to digitization, preservation, and access, we wanted to make it clear that organizations still need support to make their collections digitally available. And encouragement and knowledge from the community of people at the DLF Forum could help these organizations.

We had useful conversations with people from the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) who encouraged us to direct organizations that need help to the appropriate service hub in their state. Each DPLA service hub “offers its partners services that range from professional development, digitization, metadata creation or enhancement, to hosting or metadata aggregation.” Some potential CPC partners might be able to turn to the DPLA service hub in their state or area for assistance in making their collections available digitally. Not all states have service hubs at this time but the DPLA is working hard to reach all areas of the country, and I am confident they will be successful in the next few years. If a potential partner works with DPLA, CPC can also include the metadata in our site. There are no issues with duplicating metadata in DPLA and CPC because our site is a more targeted search while DPLA reaches a wider audience. We will include this information in our CPC educational materials to reach potential partners.

Thanks again to DLF Forum for a great conference!

The Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection

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The Connecting Presidential Collections project is thrilled to announce its newest partner, the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection.  Right now, the collection has more than 3,700 items related to Abraham Lincoln, his family, his presidency, and that era in American history. The collection will continue to grow as new items are gradually added.

When the Lincoln National Life Insurance Company was founded in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1905, the company wanted to use a photograph of President Abraham Lincoln on its letterhead as a way to symbolize the company’s values. Robert Lincoln, the president’s son, sent the company a photograph of his father to use. In appreciation, the company started the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection in 1928, and over many years, it amassed a world-class collection of Lincoln-related material. In 1931, the Lincoln Museum and Library was opened to display the collection to the public. The museum closed in 2008 but the Lincoln Financial Foundation wanted to keep the collection together. Today the collection is managed as a joint venture between the Indiana State Museum and the Allen County Public Library.

The items in CPC include some familiar photographs, such as those by famous  American Civil War photographer, Matthew Brady. The image of President Lincoln sitting in a chair is a print from a Brady negative. The collection also includes an image of Mary Todd Lincoln from Brady’s National Portrait Gallery Negative. There are also less familiar images such as a photograph of Ulysses S. Grant’s three horses–Egypt, Cincinnati, and Jeff Davis. Lincoln’s farewell address is printed below a photograph of Abraham Lincoln with his sons, Tad and Willie, standing in front of their house in Springfield, Illinois, in the summer of 1860.

Welcome to the Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection!

Vincent Voice Library at Michigan State University

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Connecting Presidential Collections is thrilled to announce a new partner: the G. Robert Vincent Voice Library at Michigan State University. The Vincent Voice Library brings a unique collection of audio clips to CPC. Some of the clips are more contemporary such as President Barack Obama’s 2009 Inaugural Address and President George W. Bush’s Address to Congress after the September 11, 2001, attacks. But the collection also includes rare gems such as a campaign speech from William Taft in 1912 and a Fourth of July speech by Calvin Coolidge from 1920.

Recordings from Taft, Coolidge along with Woodrow Wilson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Warren Harding allow CPC users to hear presidents whose voices are unknown to most people. The audio recordings also add a multimedia dimension to CPC that we hope we to expand in the future.

Beyond its presidential selection, the Vincent Voice Library holds more than 100,000 hours of audio recordings. The collection was founded by G. Robert Vincent who began making recordings in 1912 after borrowing a recording device from his friend, Charles, who was Thomas Edison’s son. We are excited to welcome the Vincent Voice Library as a partner to CPC!

James Madison Museum, Orange, VA

I wanted to take a moment and call up an exceptional museum that Sheila and I recently visited—one that, whatever you’re doing, you should stop and visit at this very instant. (Or, I suppose, during your next free weekend.*)

I’m going to be cliché here, so bear with me—but the James Madison Museum in Orange, VA, was an absolutely incredible hidden gem. We were blown away by the quality of their collection, the variety of their active exhibits, and (perhaps most of all) the ingenuity of their staff.

IMG_4925Beth Sullivan, the museum administrator, treated us to an incredible showing of the Museum’s collections, including an original copy of the Virginia ratification of the U.S. Constitution, “Preceptor” (a beautifully illustrated educational book created for “His Highness Prince George”), and a wonderfully curated set of artifacts from the Madison life and presidency.

The James Madison Museum, like so many libraries and museums we’ve visited, relies largely on public support for its wellbeing. It’s an unfortunate consequence of this model that irreplaceable artifacts, evidence of our essential shared history, are subject to the wax and wane of Americans’ personal generosity. Many sites like these have no endowment, few (if any) grant funders, and find themselves fighting tooth and nail just to stay afloat, much less rehabilitate or further disseminate their priceless holdings.

There’s a much larger discussion to be had here about public/government funding for educational and history organizations—a conversation often fraught with differing political views and our own perceived consequences of any given approach.

But there are a few things you can do immediately, and they’re so simple:

Support your local organizations.
Visit.
Make a donation, however small. (A place to start? Try the Madison roof fund.)
Join the email list.
‘Like’ them on Facebook.
Tell your friends about them.

I guarantee they’ll be grateful, and they’ll stretch your dollar so much farther than you might ever imagine.


Below are a few items from the James Madison Museum collections. Plan your visit today!

In addition to the Madison collections, the Museum is home to a number of Taylor artifacts--notable because there are so few resources for Taylor collections available.
In addition to the Madison collections, the Museum is home to a number of Taylor artifacts–notable because there are so few resources for Taylor collections available.
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Madison chair
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Madison eyeglasses

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Want a quick way to contribute? Beth has set up a GoFundMe for a much-needed new roof—take a look.

*The James Madison Museum is hosting a Plant and Bake sale THIS WEEKEND, April 25-26. Plants! Baked goods! What’s not to like?